Whether you are moving to Seattle – or just thinking about it, you’ve come to the right place. We’ve spent the last three decades welcoming new residents to the Greater Seattle area and providing them with helpful relocation information to make the transition just a little easier.

Best of all, we live, work and play in the Greater Seattle area, so we have the first-hand experience. We understand that moving your home is about more than choosing a city and neighborhood in which to live – it also entails making important decisions for your family about education, childcare, and healthcare. Moving to Seattle is about the lifestyle – outdoor recreation, sports, arts and culture, unique attractions, and fun annual festivals and events. And finally, moving to Seattle is about remembering all those little details that need your attention as you get established in your new home.

The Greater Seattle Info Guide is here to help you with all of these things; from the most important decisions to the last little detail of your move. It truly is your guide to all the resources you need to move to Seattle.

Moving to Seattle

Seattle’s varied geography encourages a lifetime commitment to personal recreation. Besides hosting some of the most spectacular scenery in the United States. Seattle has more than 6,200 acres of parkland. Walking, biking, rollerblading and jogging, as well as kayaking, sailing, rowing, and scuba-diving all can be done within the city limits. Hills, lakes, and waterways help to separate Seattle’s neighborhoods, giving them unique characteristics and appeal.  If you like an activity, but don’t want to do it alone, think of joining one of the area’s many outdoor organizations.

Seattle is home to a strong and vibrant arts community. The city proudly showcases more than 380 art installations for the public to enjoy.  Exciting sports teams including professional baseball, football, and WNBA basketball teams will get you cheering. If that’s not enough, semiprofessional sports, such as hockey, along with collegiate sports, including crew, soccer, football, and basketball provide year-round entertainment.

The Greater Seattle area is also known for its popular community events.  Day in and day out, you’ll find lots of fun things for families and singles to do throughout the Greater Seattle area.

When it comes to Seattle housing, the U.S. Census Bureau has designated 97 neighborhoods within the city limits of Seattle. Here is an introduction to the city’s population centers.

Enjoying Seattle

Seattle’s varied geography encourages a lifetime commitment to personal recreation. Besides hosting some of the most spectacular scenery in the United States. Seattle has more than 6,200 acres of parkland. Walking, biking, rollerblading and jogging, as well as kayaking, sailing, rowing, and scuba-diving all can be done within the city limits. Hills, lakes, and waterways help to separate Seattle’s neighborhoods, giving them unique characteristics and appeal.  If you like an activity, but don’t want to do it alone, think of joining one of the area’s many outdoor organizations.

Seattle is home to a strong and vibrant arts community. The city proudly showcases more than 380 art installations for the public to enjoy.  Exciting sports teams including professional baseball, football and WNBA basketball teams will get you cheering. If that’s not enough, semiprofessional sports, such as hockey, along with collegiate sports, including crew, soccer, football, and basketball provide year-round entertainment.

The Greater Seattle area is also known for its popular community events.  Day in and day out, you’ll find lots of fun things for families and singles to do throughout the Greater Seattle area.

Northwest Neighborhoods

Green Lake, Wallingford, Fremont and Phinney Ridge surround the ever-popular Woodland Park Zoo and Green Lake. Seattle’s Fremont area neighborhood houses an eclectic, artistic community. Distinctive bungalow houses are found in Wallingford. Ballard, known as Seattle’s Scandinavia, is home to waterfront attractions like the Hiram Chittenden Locks, Shilshole Bay Marina and Golden Gardens Park.

Northeast Neighborhoods

The University District and Ravena surround the University of Washington campus, northeast of downtown Seattle. Here you’ll find the high-energy lifestyle associated with college life. For a more sedate pace with panoramic Lake Washington and Mount Rainier views, Laurelhurst would be the choice.

Central Neighborhoods

A high percentage of renters and single people enjoy the energetic surroundings and convenient location of Capitol Hill, one of the city’s most diverse, yet harmonious, neighborhoods. Queen Anne and Magnolia residents enjoy easy access to city attractions, and magnificent views are possible from many homes in these neighborhoods.

Southeast Neighborhoods

The people who call these neighborhoods home take pride in a supportive network of business and residential neighborhoods, community participation and cultural diversity. Residents of neighborhoods such as Mount Baker, Seward Park and Rainier Beach have views of Lake Washington and Mount Rainier, as well as access to the Lake and a large number of city parks situated practically in their backyards.

Southwest Neighborhoods

Only a few minutes from downtown Seattle, West Seattle residents enjoy the peacefulness of long stretches of waterfront. In the Alki neighborhood, housing reflects the beach-community atmosphere with old cottages tucked in between newer apartments and condominiums, while Fauntleroy features elegant manors nestled on view bluffs.